NEOPRONOUNs GUIDE
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(DISCLAIMER: This carrd is big. I wanted it to be a good resource, with the greatest amount of information possible, not only the neopronoun basics. Take your time to read it and absorb the information in the best way.)

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pronouns and gender pronouns
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A pronoun is a word that people use to refer either to themselves (such as me and you) or to someone or something. Gender pronouns are personal pronouns, used specifically to refer to people. Some gender pronouns are read as neutral, feminine, or masculine, and some have been created as an alternative to or rejection of the gender binary (neopronouns). The commonly used gender pronouns are "he", "she", and "they".

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Everyone has the right to use the gender pronouns that match their personal identity. These pronouns are part of their gender expression (other elements of gender expression are how a person dresses, how a person looks, or how a person behaves, for example).

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Your pronouns are the pronouns you feel comfortable with. Names and pronouns might conventionally be associated with femininity, masculinity or neutrality, but, and this is very important, any person, of any gender, can use any name and any pronouns they're comfortable with, no matter if they're cis or trans, binary or non-binary, gender comforming or GNC.

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Someone's pronouns might "match" their gender or their overall gender expression, but they might not. A person might use one set of pronouns, or multiple sets of pronouns, or use any/all pronouns. And, since pronouns are part of a person's expression, they might also change.

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That's why it's so important to ask people's pronouns, and to let people know what your pronouns are. When someone is referred to with the wrong pronouns, they may feel disrespected, invalidated, dismissed, or dysphoric, and you won't know which pronouns to use unless you ask.

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To normalize this, it's also recommended to introduce yourself with your pronouns, like: I am/my name is (name), and my pronouns are (pronoun set).

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PGP

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You may have heard about "preferred pronouns" or "preferred gender pronouns", just like "preferred name". Unless a person uses multiple sets of pronouns and multiple names, you shouldn't ask about their preferred pronouns or name.

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If a person uses one pronoun set or one name, those aren't preferred, they're mandatory.

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For people with multiple names and sets of pronouns, they might have a preference depending on the person they’re talking to and the context, so in this case it’s good to ask what their preferred name and pronouns are.

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WHAT ARE NEOPRONOUNS?
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Neopronouns are a category of gender pronouns that are used in place of “she,” “he,” or “they” when referring to a person. They are third person pronouns created with the intent of being pronoun sets that transcend the traditional "masculine", "feminine" and "neutral" (though sometimes neopronouns can be described as gender-neutral pronoun sets), being often referred to as "gender inclusive pronouns", since they do not associate a gender with the individual who is being discussed. These pronouns are, for the most part, not officially recognized in the language.

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The term “neopronouns” tends to refer to pronoun sets developed from the 20th century (or sometimes 19th century) to today. Many of them are actually not that new as "neo" suggests.

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NOTE: The more well known neopronouns are from the 20th century, but historically there have been two used since the 1300s, specifically ou and (h)a. Ou derives from the Middle English (h)a which is a “reduced form of the Old and Middle English masculine and feminine pronouns he and heo*.”

(heo = "she")
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WHO CAN USE NEOPRONOUNS?
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Objectively, everybody. Any person can use any pronouns they're comfortable with. Usually, neopronouns are used by people who have a complex relationship with gender, most often transgender, non-binary, and/or gender nonconforming (GNC) people, but the name or pronouns someone goes by do not necessarily indicate anything about the person’s gender or other identities. So, yes, anyone can use neopronouns, even if they're cis.

(cis = cisgender, a person who isn't trans).
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NEURODIVERGENT PEOPLE

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Many neopronouns have been coined by neurodivergent people. The reason for this is because neurodivergent people tend to have a special relationship with gender, especially autistic people. Many (not all) neurodivergent people have difficulty understanding gender because it is, at its core, a social construct.

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Some neurodivergent people cannot separate their gender identity and gender expression from their neurodivergence – being neurodivergent doesn’t cause their gender identity and expression, but it is inextricably related to how they understand and experience gender. So they might use neopronouns for comfort in their identities.

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Some neopronouns are even specifically made by and for neurodivergent people, sometimes even being directly tied to neurodiversity (like "au/auti/autis/autiself", made by and for autistic people specifically) and can't be used by neurotypical people.

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DIFFERENT CULTURES 1/2

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For some people, whose first language isn't English, or that are part of a culture where gender does not have the same standards and binary limitations as is common for most european cultures, using neopronouns may be necessary for properly portraing their gender expression, so they can accurately express their identity or carry properly back into their culture.

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NOTE: People whose native language isn't English might use pronouns that "agree" with or feel similar to the ones they use in their native language, but that's definitely not a rule. Each language is different, and those people's experiences will change when they switch languages, so their pronouns might change too. But they won't always use neopronouns, of course.
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DIFFERENT CULTURES 2/2
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Since neopronuns can come from nouns (nounself pronouns), some might be directly related to cultures and religions.

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That way, it's better to use pronouns that are only similar to the original noun if it's tied to specific cultures, specially if you're not a part of that culture. If you use the root word for the neopronoun, it may be seen as cultural and/or religious insensitivity.

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When choosing a neopronoun to go by, try to make sure it isn't harmful or disrespectful to anyone, and any cultures or beliefs.

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NOTE: If you find out a pronoun you use can be seen as harmful, try to change the root word to a similar one, in spelling or phonetically, or look for one that has similar meanings or comes from a similar concept!

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EXAMPLE: "Fae" pronouns are themed around the idea of the Fair Folk (the fae), nature beings that are part of the Celtic culture, and very powerful beings. Since they are exactly the same as the root word (fae/faerie), some Celtic pagans say that using those pronouns can be considered disrespectful, and that's why people made similar pronouns to replace the old ones, since using the original ones can be seen as religious or cultural insensitivity. So for "fae/faen/faer/faers/faenself",
"fae/faem/faer/faers/faeself", "fae/fem/faer/faers/faerself", "fae/fae/faer/faers/faeself" and
"fae/faer/faer/faers/faerself", there are alternatives like "fey/feym/feir/feirs/feirself" or "fey/feys/feir/feirs/feirself".
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NEOPRONOUN HISTORY
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According to the grammarians, the first gender-neutral pronoun was generic he. In 1542, William Lily wrote a Latin grammar, in English, proclaiming the ancient doctrine called the worthiness of the genders: “The Masculine Gender is more worthy than the Feminine, and the Feminine more worthy than the Neuter.”

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Henry VIII made Lily’s Latin the official grammar of all English schools. At the time, English was not considered a language worthy enough to have a grammar, and when English grammars started to appear a century later, that worthiness doctrine led English grammarians to promote generic he.

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SOME EARLY REGIONAL NOMINATIVE PRONOUNS

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A or (H)A
"In 1789, William H. Marshall records […] Middle English epicene ‘a’, used by the 14th century English writer John of Trevisa and both the OED and Wright's English Dialect Dictionary confirm the use of ‘a’ for he, she, it, they, and even I. This ‘a’ is a reduced form of the Anglo-Saxon he = ‘he’ and heo = ‘she’.”
Some living British dialects still use the gender-neutral "a" pronoun.

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OU
Ou was first recorded in a native English dialect in the sixteenth century. "In 1789, William H. Marshall records the existence of a dialectal English epicene pronoun, singular ou: '"Ou will" expresses either he will, she will, or it will.'" It was derived from (h)a.

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In 1770, the usage critic Robert Baker advocated that he was not just the first gender-neutral pronoun, but the first pronoun. Baker went on to argue that having only one pronoun created a lot of ambiguity. Channeling the supposed creation of Eve from Adam’s extra rib, Baker claimed that English speakers formed she out of he to clear up the confusion.

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge, said in 1808 that it would make a great gender-neutral pronoun. The suggestion was ignored.

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In 1851, John Stuart Mill complained that the lack of a gender-neutral pronoun forced him to use generic he, which was “more than a defect” in English because it rendered half the human species invisible. Mill didn’t coin a pronoun to correct this defect.

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There were plenty of word coiners who were eager to supply Mill’s missing word. They came up with ou (1789), ne (ca. 1850), heesh (ca. 1860), er (1863), ve (1864), en, han, and un (1868), le (1871), e (1878), and ip (1884), to name just a few of the early ones.

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NE
Several sets of pronouns use "ne" in the nominative form. One set of "ne" pronouns is one of the oldest sets of neo-pronouns, but not all its forms were recorded: ne, nim, nis, (not recorded), (not recorded), which was created around 1850, and appeared in print in 1884. Some of the better-attested sets of "ne" pronouns, in alphabetical order:

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Ne
ne, nem, nir, nirs, nemself.
Forms:
Nominative (Ne): When I tell someone a joke, ne laughs.
Accusative (Nem): When I greet a friend I hug nem.
Pronominal possessive (Nir): When someone does not get a haircut, nir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Nirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow nirs.
Reflexive (Nemself): Each child feeds nemself.

ne, ner, nis, nis, nemself.
Forms:
Nominative (Ne): When I tell someone a joke ne laughs.
Accusative (Ner): When I greet a friend I hug ner.
Pronominal possessive (Nis): When someone does not get a haircut, nis hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Nis): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow nis.
Reflexive (Nemself): Each child feeds nemself.

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E
e, em, es (e's), (e's), (not recorded)
Forms:
Nominative (E): When I tell someone a joke e (or E) laughs.
Accusative (Em): When I greet a friend I hug em.
Pronominal possessive (Es): When someone does not get a haircut, es hair grows long.
Predicative possessive: (not recorded)
Reflexive (emself): Each child feeds emself.

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In 1858, the American composer C. C. Converse proposed thon, based on a contraction of "that one." The Gender-Neutral Pronoun FAQ gives this pronoun's date of origin as 1884 instead, while Words and Women gives 1859. The "thon" pronoun was included in some dictionaries: Webster's International Dictionary (1910), and Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary (1913), and Webster's Second International (1959), but those dictionary endorsements didn’t win a lot of converts, and thon soon fell into disuse.

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THON
thon, thon, thons, thon's, thonself.
Forms:
Nominative (Thon): When I tell someone a joke thon laughs.
Accusative (Thon): When I greet a friend I hug thon.
Pronominal possessive (Thons): When someone does not get a haircut, thons hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Thon's): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow thon's.
Reflexive (Thonself): Each child feeds thonself.
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In 1912, Chicago school superintendent Ella Flagg Young “invented” heer, himer, and hiser (Young's friend, Fred Pond, coined heer a year earlier, in 1911). Heer, himer, and hiser made it into Funk and Wagnalls' Standard Dictionary in 1913. Like thon, they were ignored.

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And in 1930, A. A. Milne, creator of Winnie the Pooh, toyed with the idea of gender-neutral “heesh”: "If the English Language had been properly organized . . . then there would be a word which meant both ‘he’ and ‘she’, and I could write, ‘If John or Mary comes, heesh will want to play tennis’, which would save a lot of trouble." A few sentences later he abruptly dropped the idea of heesh.

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In 1970, Mary Orovan created co, derived from the Indo-European *ko, as an inclusive alternative to "he or she."

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CO
co, co, co's (cos), co's, coself
Forms:
Nominative (Co): When I tell someone a joke co laughs.
Accusative (Co): When I greet a friend I hug co.
Pronominal possessive (Co's, Cos): When someone does not get a haircut, co's hair grows long. (Or cos hair grows.)
Predicative possessive (Co's): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow co's.
Reflexive (Coself): Each child feeds coself.

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Since 1970, there have been several sets of pronouns that use "ve" in the nominative form. (In 1970, an incompletely recorded set was ve, vir, vis, (not recorded), (not recorded), published in the May issue of Everywoman).

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VE
ve, ver, vis, vis, verself
Forms:
Nominative (Ve): When I tell someone a joke ve laughs.
Accusative (Ver, Vir): When I greet a friend I hug ver. (Or: "I hug vir.)
Pronominal possessive (Vis): When someone does not get a haircut, vis hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Vis): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow vis.
Reflexive (Verself): Each child feeds verself.

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Similar to Ve, we have xe, xhe, ze, zhe and zie. The earliest documented version was created in 1972.

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XE
xe, hir, hir, hirs, hirself
Forms:
Nominative (Xe): When I tell someone a joke xe laughs.
Accusative (Hir): When I greet a friend I hug hir.
Pronominal possessive (Hir): When someone does not get a haircut, hir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Hirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow hirs.
Reflexive (Hirself): Each child feeds hirself.
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xe, xir, xir, xirs, xirself
Forms:
Nominative (Xe): When I tell someone a joke xe laughs.
Accusative (Xir): When I greet a friend I hug xir.
Pronominal possessive (Xir): When someone does not get a haircut, xir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Xirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow xirs.
Reflexive (Xirself): Each child feeds xirself.
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xe, xyr (xem), xyr, xyrs, xyrself (xemself)
Forms:
Nominative (Xe): When I tell someone a joke xe laughs.
Accusative (Xyr, Xem): When I greet a friend I hug xem. (Or hug xyr.)
Pronominal possessive (Xyr): When someone does not get a haircut, xyr hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Xyrs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow xyrs.
Reflexive (Xemself): Each child feeds xyrself. (Or feeds xemself.)

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ZE
ze, hir, hir, hirs, hirself
Forms:
Nominative (Ze): When I tell someone a joke ze laughs.
Accusative (Hir): When I greet a friend I hug hir.
Pronominal possessive (Hir): When someone does not get a haircut, hir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Hirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow hirs.
Reflexive (Hirself): Each child feeds hirself.

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ZIE
zie, zir (zim), zir, zirs, zirself
Forms:
Nominative (Zie): When I tell someone a joke zie laughs.
Accusative (Zir, Zim): When I greet a friend I hug zir. (Or hug zim.)
Pronominal possessive (Zir): When someone does not get a haircut, zir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Zirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow zirs.
Reflexive (Zirself): Each child feeds zirself.

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In an issue of the Newsletter of the American Anthropological Association, John Clark created "per" pronouns". They can be compared to Phelps's "phe" pronouns, which are also based on the word person.

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PERSON PRONOUNS (PER)
per (person), per, per, pers, perself
Forms:
Nominative (Per, Person): When I tell someone a joke per laughs. (Or person laughs.)
Accusative (Per): When I greet a friend I hug per.
Pronominal possessive (Per): When someone does not get a haircut, per hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Pers): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow pers.
Reflexive (Perself): Each child feeds perself.

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PERSON PRONOUNS (PHE)
phe, per, pers, pers, perself
Forms:
Nominative (Phe): When I tell someone a joke phe laughs.
Accusative (Per): When I greet a friend I hug per.
Pronominal possessive (Pers): When someone does not get a haircut, pers hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Pers): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow pers.
Reflexive (Perself): Each child feeds perself.

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In 1975, Christine M. Elverson of Skokie, Illinois, created the Elverson pronouns to win a contest. There are several very similar sets of pronouns with the nominative form of "E", which have been independently proposed or revived over the last hundred years. The oldest of these is the Spivak pronoun set, that Michael Spivak used in his manual, The Joy of TeX, in 1990, so that no person in his examples had a specified gender. Another set, already mentioned, was coined in 1890 by James Rogers of Crestview, Florida, and apparently created around 1878.

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ELVERSON PRONOUNS (EY)
ey, em, eir, eirs, emself.
Forms:
Nominative (Ey): When I tell someone a joke ey laughs.
Accusative (Em): When I greet a friend I hug em.
Pronominal possessive (Eir): When someone does not get a haircut, eir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Eirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow eirs.
Reflexive: Each child feeds emself.

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SPIVAK PRONOUNS (E)
E, Em, Eir, Eirs, Emself
Forms:
Nominative (E): When I tell someone a joke E laughs.
Accusative (Em): When I greet a friend I hug Em.
Pronominal possessive (Eir): When someone does not get a haircut, Eir hair grows long.
Predicative possessive (Eirs): If I need a phone, my friend lets me borrow Eirs.
Reflexive (Emself): Each child feeds Emself.

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Of course, that' only a fraction of neopronoun history, specially considering that neopronouns keep being created and reinvented.

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In more recent terms (late 2013), for example, a new variety of neopronouns appeared: nounself pronouns. They consist in adapting any noun into a pronoun, enableing the creation of a wide variety of very personal and descriptive pronouns.

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Later on (late 2017/early 2018), another kind of pronouns of pronouns emerged: emoji pronouns (or "emojiself pronouns"), and emoticonself pronouns. Similar to nounself pronouns but only meant to be used over the internet, they might be used for a number of reasons, such as one liking the way they look or the way they may sound in their head, or because one feels they describe them or reflect their gender well. They're meant to be text-based only, so most people who use emojiself and emoticonself pronouns outside the internet have other sets of pronouns, often nounself pronouns that come from the same word as the emoji or related to the expressions of facial representation formed by emoticons.

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Those kinds of neopronouns are a creative and often light-hearted experiment in gender expression, intended to be used by people who feel that they express what is distinctive about themselves. They're meant to be fun, and to stand against what we see as ‘normal’ and ‘typical’ pronouns. The thing with neopronouns is trying to make new pronouns that reflect how we feel and how we want our pronouns to be. All of them are valid. Make sure you always respect other’s pronouns, no matter how weird or silly they seem.

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NOTE: Nounself pronouns can be especially difficult to use for people who speak English as a second language, or who are neurodivergent or disabled, and emoji pronouns are meant to be text-based only. For this reason, people who use any of those often offer a secondary set of more standard pronouns, for accessibility. This secondary set may be called "auxiliary pronouns", or simply "aux". Auxiliary pronouns are specially often used for nounself pronouns that are tied to themes that are common triggers, like horror and gore, that may cause disconfort.

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If you want to know more neopronouns, here are a few sources! They mostly include the earliest neopronouns, recent neopronouns and nounself pronouns.

PRONOUN LIST CARRD
PRONOUN ISLAND
PRONOUN LIST (Ask a Non-Binary: Every Pronoun Set Of Which We Are Aware)
PRONOUNS LIST (Outdated/Incomplete)
PRONOUN LIST
PRONOUNS ARCHIVE
EVERY PRONOUN SET (NEOPRONOUNS AND NOUNSELF PRONOUNS) LIST
PRONOUN PROVIDER

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And, if you're interested:

PRONOUN GENERATOR

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NEOPRONOUNS FLAG
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neopronouns flag, with five same-sized horizontal stripes

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this is the neopronouns flag, created by @beanjamoose on tumblr, and can be used by anyone who uses neopronouns

the colors are:

green, for masculine-identifying people who use neopronouns
hex: #6bf4a1
rgb: (107, 244, 161)
cmyk: (56%, 0%, 34%, 4%)

blue, for older pronoun sets and the history behind them
hex: #a1f8ff
rgb: (161, 248, 255)
cmyk: (37%, 3%, 0%, 0%)

white, for nonbinary-identifying people who use neopronouns
hex: #ffffff
rgb: (255, 255, 255)
cmyk: (0%, 0%, 0%, 0%)

yellow, for newer pronoun sets and the happiness that comes from them
hex: #ffeda1
rgb: (255, 237, 161)
cmyk: (0%, 7%, 37%, 0%)

orange, for feminine-identifying people who use neopronouns
hex: #f4be6b
rgb: (244, 190, 107)
cmyk: (0%, 22%, 56%, 4%)

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NOUNSELF PRONOUNS FLAG
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nounself pronouns flag, with five same-sized horizontal stripes

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this is the nounself pronouns flag, created by @GeekyCorn on deviantart, and can be used by anyone who uses nounself pronouns (exclusively or non-exclusively), regardless of gender identity.

the colors are:

dark lime green, for nounself agender people.
hex: #154015
rgb: (21,64,21)
cmyk: 67%, 0%, 67%, 75%)

light cyan/lime green, for nounself men.
hex: #a1f8ff
rgb: (136, 255, 207)
cmyk: (47%, 0%, 19%, 0%)

pale green, for nounself multigender people.
hex: #eaffe0
rgb: (234, 255, 224)
cmyk: (8%, 0%, 12%, 0%)

light green, for nounself nonbinary/other people.
hex: #d7ff8d
rgb: (215, 255, 141)
cmyk: (16%, 0%, 45%, 0%)

light orange, for nounself women.
hex: #ffc675
rgb: (255, 198, 117)
cmyk: (0%, 22%, 54%, 0%)

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HOW TO USE NEOPRONOUNS
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Neopronouns are pretty much used like any other personal pronouns. When you use neopronouns, it's just like more common gender pronouns, or a name or a nickname. It may take you a while to get used to it, but take your time and don't worry!

Just do your best. Neopronoun users are aware they can be really difficult for a lot of people, specially people with disabilities and people whose native language isn’t English, so they’ll mostly understand your struggle.

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As already exemplified in this carrd, pronouns come in sets of five forms (nominative, accusative, pronominal possessive, predicative possessive and reflexive). If someone uses a neopronoun and those five forms aren't clear, please ask the person to share all the forms with you, so you can learn, practice and get used to it.

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Don’t panic over pronunciation! There are common ways to pronounce the more well-known neopronouns (you can simply look it up online), but there are many variations, so it is best to ask the person you're going to use them for. Don't worry about the person feeling uncomfortable – just like it is with pronouns in general, it's way better for the person if you ask than if you simply assume and end up getting it wrong. It's always okay to ask for clarification if you need it!

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A few resources that can help you to adapt are:
7 Ways To Support Someone Who’s Changing Their Name & Pronouns
PRACTICE WITH PRONOUNS
PRONOUNS GAME
(But, seriously. Just ask for help if you need it.)

You can also check pronouny, as it has a list of public pronouns and examples! If you want to be an ally, you can also create a profile with your pronouns (and, if you want, names and lists of good and bad nouns) and link it to your social media (example: put it in your facebook or twitter!)

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NOTE: Experiences aren't universal. Pronouns are a very personal thing, and that's why neopronouns forms and pronunciations might change from one person to another. That's exactly why it's better to ask than to assume.

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FAQ - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (& some common misconceptions)
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WHAT ARE SOME COMMON NEOPRONOUNS?
According to a 2018 survey, the 5 most used neopronouns are xe/xem, e/em, ze/zir, fae/faer (suggested to be replaced by alternatives due to this issue) and ey/em, followed by ze/zir, ae/aer, ve/ver and ne/nem.
Check out this page of the carrd for neopronouns lists and similar resources!

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NEOPRONOUNS AREN'T REAL WORDS! THEY'RE JUST MADE UP!
Yes, literally every word is made up! Neopronouns are real because they carry meaning and are understood by others.

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COULDN'T YOU JUST USE THEY/THEM?
No, not really. Some people don't feel comfortable with those pronouns or don't think they're enough to reflect their gender identity, perception and expression.

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I DON'T UNDERSTAND, HOW DO I USE THESE PRONOUNS IN A CONVERSATION?
Ask for the person who is using them for help. Also, the resources for practicing in our how to use neopronouns session might help you on that.

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HOW DO I LET PEOPLE KNOW MY PRONOUNS?
Online, you can put them in your social media’s bios, your email signature, your zoom name, your whatsapp or telegram status, etc, and even create a pronouny profile to link in your social media pages. In real life, you can introduce yourself using your name and pronouns, wear a pronoun pin or bracelet, and similar. Please do that if you want to be a better ally!

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SO I CAN USE NEOPRONOUNS? EVEN IF I'M NOT NONBINARY OR NEURODIVERGENT?
Yes! If it makes you comfortable and suits your gender expression, go for it! Just remember to check if the sets you like aren't neurodivergent-specific or nonbinary-specific.

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SO I CAN JUST MAKE UP A PRONOUN? RANDOMLY?
In theory, yes. There are a lot of people that create neopronouns and don't use them. If your intentions aren't bad, you can totally createa new set of pronouns, specially if you're trans, GNC and/or nonbinary.

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THESE PRONOUNS SOUND SILLY. THEY'RE BAD FOR TRANS PEOPLE, AND THEY MAKE CIS PEOPLE DISRESPECT THE COMMUNITY!
No, transphobia does that. Neopronouns don't have anything to do with transphobia. They make trans, GNC and nonbinary people comfortable. If they didn't exist, cis people would find other things to use against the trans and nonbinary community.
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WHY WOULD YOU SAY I'M ABLEIST BY MAKING FUN OF NEOPRONOUNS?
See "neurodivergent people"

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WHY WOULD YOU SAY I'M XENOPHOBIC BY MAKING FUN OF NEOPRONOUNS?
See "different cultures"


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I'M STILL CONFUSED. HOW DO I LEARN MORE?
Check our links and resources, and make your own research!

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Got any other questions? ASK ME HERE!

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SOURCES

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Besides my own experiences as a non-binary, genderqueer, GNC trans person, and the shared experiences of some nonbinary, GNC and trans friends, I also did some research on a few topics. The information might not be exactly the same, because I found it better to change it up a little bit, considering other points of view and my own experiences.
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Gender Identity and Pronouns
Gender Pronouns
Defining: Neopronoun
Neopronouns: What do you mean you go by a set of pronouns I've never heard before?
A Non-Binary Person’s Guide to Invented Pronouns
Gendervague: At the Intersection of Autistic and Trans Experiences
Neopronouns, they’re way older than you think
Nonbinary pronouns are older than you think
English neutral pronouns
Nounself pronouns: 3rd person personal pronouns as identity expression
Nounself pronouns
Emojiself pronouns masterlist
Uses And Meanings Of The Neopronouns flag
Nounself pronouns flag

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OTHER NEOPRONOUN CARRDS
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neopronouns list
neopronoun education

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